Hambleton Village

Hambleton Village

Hambleton means ‘the settlement’ (tun) ‘on the crooked hill’ (Hamble). The village is situated on the Hambleton Peninsula, surrounded on three sides by Rutland Water. It is about three kilometres from the small market town of Oakham.

There is a wonderful view across to Burley-on-the-Hill from the north side of the village, and from the south, one can see across to the sailing club on the far shore. The track along the lakeside takes walkers and cyclists through bluebell woods (on conservation land), right round the peninsular, from one side of the village to the other.

Hambleton has a long history which pre-dates the Doomsday Book. It is thought that Hambleton was at one time the capital of the Anglo Saxon Kings in Rutland. The Doomsday Book records from 1086 show the village to have had an estimated population of 750; with 3 priests; 3 churches; a mill and 45 ploughs at work.

In 1976 the flooding of the lower land – to create Rutland Water as a water source for Peterborough and its surrounding area – left just Upper Hambleton and part of Middle Hambleton, now just known as ‘Hambleton’. Nether Hambleton (known as the ‘lost village’), is now under Rutland Water, and has been shown by excavation to have once been a sizeable medieval settlement. All that remains of Middle Hambleton are the ‘Old Hall’ (Jacobean: built in 1611, now situated just at the water’s edge), and some dwellings on the lower slope.